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Extant animals size
#21
The Tiger Shark is beautiful. I know they are a danger to humans, but it is still very sad that they caught a pregnant female. They would have killed her and her unborn young. Smiley19 It is not just the death of one shark, it is the death of a whole family that never had a chance.
[Image: IMG_9091.JPG]
Catherine

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#22
[Image: dd1x6k7-93a2667b-eb02-452e-b367-5d28092a...RBYrPTUHa8]

The colossal squid is believed to be the largest squid species. It is known from only a few specimens, and its maximum size is estimated at 12–14 m (40–46 ft) long and weighing possibly up to 750 kg based on analysis of smaller and immature specimens, making it the largest-known invertebrate.

It's eyes are about the size of a dinner plate, the largest eyes of any animal. A partly collapsed specimen measured 27 cm (11 in) in diameter, with a 9 cm (3.5 in) pupil. The eye was estimated to be 30 to 40 cm (12 to 16 in) when the squid was alive. Colossal squids live in deep water, diving as deep as 2.2 km (7,200 feet).

(The species was first discovered in the form of two tentacles found in the stomach of a sperm whale in 1925. In 1981, a Russian trawler in the Ross Sea, off the coast of Antarctica, caught a large squid with a total length of over 4 m (13 ft), which was later identified as an immature female colossal squid. In 2003 a complete specimen of a sub adult female was found near the surface with a total length of 6 m (20 ft) and a mantle length of 2.5 m (8 ft 2 in). This specimen shows that colossal squids may grow larger than 500 kg, possibly up to 750 kg. The largest recorded specimen was captured in 2007 by a New Zealand fishing boat off Antarctica. It was estimated to measure 4.5 m (15 ft) in length and weigh 495 kg.)
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#23
That is one big squid! We know how big we think they get, but we don't really know. They could get bigger. We have barely had any contact with them. 
It make you wonder if there are other things in the ocean that we haven't seen.
[Image: IMG_9091.JPG]
Catherine

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#24
(03-13-2019, 03:09 PM)Catherine Wrote: That is one big squid! We know how big we think they get, but we don't really know. They could get bigger. We have barely had any contact with them. It make you wonder if there are other things in the ocean that we haven't seen.

There still could be creatures that live in the deep we have not seen.


[Image: ddlr3vi-45d9aa67-e30e-4492-8334-b7f2e4c7...65AVWdbaPY]

Bottlenose dolphins are the most common and well-known members of the family of oceanic dolphin. The common bottlenose dolphin is the most well-known species which measures 2 to 4 m (6.6 - 13 ft) long and weighs about 150 - 650 kg. Males are generally larger and heavier than females. The common bottlenose dolphin is the largest species of the beaked dolphins.


[Image: ddli3ow-b6752738-67e3-4778-96c9-43a91dc9...eZrnDLOelc]

The beluga whale also known as the white whale, as it is the only cetacean of this color and the melon head. It is a mid-sized toothed whale measuring about 3.5 to 5.5 m (11 to 18 ft) in length and weigh in the neighborhood of 1 - 1.6 tonnes and occasionally up to 2 tonnes.
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#25
I suspect there are animals in the oceans and other remote places that we have not seen. 
Certainly what we have seen is amazing.

The dolphins and beluga whales are so beautiful and intelligent. White animals are not common so having even one kind of white whale is special. I just hope we don't cause their extinction.
[Image: IMG_9091.JPG]
Catherine

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#26
(12-07-2019, 03:11 PM)Catherine Wrote: White animals are not common so having even one kind of white whale is special. 

There is also white dolphin. 
From the beginning i wrongly put these images into pictures section instead of arts section. If you have any options to move big threads altogether easily to another section then move my 2 threads to arts section. If it's difficult then leave it, doesn't matter.
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#27
Hello again, Sameer! Good to see you. Hope that you are well. Great thread. I have moved this thread to Arts as you requested. I don't have time to move your other one right now, but maybe another time.
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#28
I was confused until I read the newest posts. I was sure this thread was in the pictures section last night. Now I understand that it was.   You are right it does belong in the art section. I will try and  move the other thread.
[Image: IMG_9091.JPG]
Catherine

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#29
(12-08-2019, 05:04 PM)Catherine Wrote: You are right it does belong in the art section. I will try and move the other thread.

I just noted both of them are now in the right section.  28

(12-07-2019, 10:45 PM)LPC Wrote: Hello again, Sameer! Good to see you. Hope that you are well. Great thread. I have moved this thread to Arts as you requested. I don't have time to move your other one right now, but maybe another time.

Thank you..I hope you are doing well too.


[Image: ddlylr3-0b92a2f2-6c39-4ab6-a2a9-40c6f396...i5wPL6uSFY]

The Indian Ocean humpback dolphins have only been recognized as a species since 2014, yet they are categorized as endangered. These little-known dolphins are shy and swim in small pods. Indian humpback dolphin is one of the medium-sized dolphin that measures 2 to 2.8 m (6.6 to 9.2 ft) in length and weighs about 150 to 200 kg.  

These dolphins prefer shallow waters which also puts them in danger. They are incidentally caught in shark nets, hunted for food and sometimes used as bait for sharks. They experience extremely high rates of calf and juvenile mortality due to anthropogenic disturbances such as environmental pollution, habitat deterioration and noise pollution. Sadsmiley
  
Between 1980 and 2009, 203 humpback dolphins died in the shark nets off KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. Recent investigative studies have revealed that the United Arab Emirates houses one of the world's largest populations. Abu Dhabi is home to the world's largest population of endangered Indian Ocean humpback dolphins( about 701 Indian Ocean humpback dolphins inhabit the southern quarters of the Arabian Gulf). While habitat loss and human activities are pushing the little-known marine mammals to the brink of extinction.
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#30
It is terrible that the Indian Ocean Humpback Dolphins are having such a hard time. As usual it is humans that are the problem.
Dolphins being caught in shark nets is truly tragic. I don't even like the idea of shark nets for sharks. I am horrified that the dolphins are hunted for food. I hope they are able to survive what humans are doing to them. Some day when we behave better we will be sorry for what we have done to them.
[Image: IMG_9091.JPG]
Catherine

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